Let Us Ease Your Dental Anxiety in Grand Rapids, Michigan

Categories: Cosmetic Dentistry

family dentistry Grand RapidsAre you worried about seeing the dentist? Are you anxious about discussing your smile? Settling into the reality of what you are prepared to discuss with your dentist is the first step to relief.

1. Talk to Us:
Whether you want to have porcelain veneers placed or your teeth straightened with Invisalign, call now to schedule a complimentary consultation. If you’re nervous about implant dentistry, restorative dentistry or interested in teeth whitening, the reality is that Dr. Stewart and Dr. Hull have been meeting with patients since 1974 in Comstock Park, Michigan. Stewart and Hull Aesthetic and General Dentistry have been here and will continue to be here for you when you’re ready.  616-784-2377.

2. Make an Appointment:

The next step is making an appointment. Stewart and Hull Aesthetic and General Dentistry offers quality dentistry with competitive pricing and affordable options. We service the Belmont, Grand Rapids, Sparta, Walker and Rockford, MI area with pleasure and look forward to treating your dental concerns with accuracy, gentleness and care.

3. Go Forward with Confidence:
The final step to relief is just smiling. We’d like to provide Invisalign, general dentistry or cosmetic dentistry for you. We are certain you’ll walk out the door smiling.

We can whiten, brighten, and straighten your smile!

Dr. Stewart and Dr. Hull
Stewart and Hull Aesthetic and General Dentistry
769 York Creek Dr NW
Comstock Park, Michigan 49321
616-784-2377
https://www.greatmismiles.com/dental-services/

Cosmetic Dentistry: Gum Contouring In Grand Rapids

Categories: Cosmetic Dentistry

Cosmetic Dentistry: Gum Contouring In Comstock Park

If you are a regular visitor Stewart and Hull Aesthetic and General Dentistry’s blog, you have probably read many articles on cosmetic dentistry procedures. Composite bonding, crowns, and porcelain veneers can repair teeth that are chipped, broken, or misshapen.

Our Grand Rapids, Belmont, Comstock Park, Sparta, Walker and Rockford, MI patients with stained or dull teeth can have bright white smiles with teeth whitening. Tooth-colored fillings, inlays, and onlays are used to repair cavities. Dental implants are gaining popularity in Rockford MI among dental patients who want to restore missing teeth. If your teeth are misaligned, we offer Invisalign as an orthodontic option.

What if your cosmetic dental problem is related to your gum tissue? Are you one of the many Grand Rapids residents whose gums are too long, too short, or uneven? There is a solution for gum problems as well. You can improve the shape or size of your gums with gum contouring.

For more information about dental procedures offered in our office, please call 616-827-7019.

Dr. Stewart and Dr. Hull
Stewart and Hull Aesthetic and General Dentistry
769 York Creek Dr NW
Comstock Park Michigan 49321
616-827-7019
https://www.greatmismiles.com/meet-dr-bruce-stewart

Signs That Your Tooth Has A Cavity

Categories: Oral Health

We have all experienced those times when we have a toothache and think…”Do I have a cavity?” You brush twice a day and floss regularly, so a cavity is unlikely. Right? Here is how you can tell if it’s time to give us a call:

The Signs and Symptoms of a Cavity

It’s believed that roughly 90% of Americans will get at least one cavity in their lifetime. When a cavity is in its initial stages, you will often be symptom-free and experience no discomfort at all. It’s not until the tooth decay has reached a certain level that you will begin to notice the signs and symptoms. While a toothache and sensitivity to hot and cold foods and liquids are surefire signs that you have a cavity, there are lesser-known symptoms as well. If you’re experiencing any of these warning signs, you may want to consider making an appointment with our office as soon as possible:

• Persistent bad breath or a bad taste in the mouth
• When you bite down, there is a sticky, tarry feeling
• Puss or discharge around a tooth
• A visible discoloring, usually black or brown
• Small pits or holes in the tooth

Routine dental care is important. While good oral hygiene, a healthy diet, and regular cleanings at the dentist will deter the formation of cavities, they do not constitute a foolproof practice. A cavity can occur at any time, no matter what your age. Bacteria causes tooth decay, and no amount of brushing, flossing, and rinsing will eradicate all the bacteria from your mouth. If you think you may have a cavity, please contact our office immediately.

Foods That Can Harm Enamel

Categories: Oral Health

Many people who are careful about brushing and flossing their teeth wonder how they still end up with cavities or tooth decay. Several factors affect wear and tear on tooth enamel. Diet is a major factor, with certain foods increasing the likelihood that your enamel will become discolored or decayed. Pay close attention to the foods you eat to keep your pearly whites looking healthy and clean.

What Causes Enamel Damage?

Tooth enamel refers to the hard, semi-translucent, whitish part of the tooth that shows above your gums. The enamel is primarily composed of minerals that are strong but susceptible to highly acidic foods. When acid reacts with the minerals in enamel, tooth decay results. Strongly pigmented foods can also damage enamel by discoloring the surface of the tooth.

Foods that Harm Enamel

Acidic foods are the greatest source of enamel damage. To determine whether a food is acidic, look up its pH. Scientists use pH, on a one-to-seven scale, to define the relative acidity or alkalinity of a substance. Foods with low pH levels, between a one and three, are high in acidity and may damage your enamel. Foods with high pH levels, such as a six or seven, are far less likely to cause enamel harm.

So which foods should you avoid? Many fruits are high in acidity, including lemons, grapefruit, strawberries, grapes, and apples. The high sugar and acid content in soda makes it another huge contributor to enamel decay. Moderately acidic foods include pineapple, oranges, tomatoes, cottage cheese, maple syrup, yogurt, raisins, pickles, and honey. The foods that are least likely to cause enamel damage include milk, most cheeses, eggs, and water.

Beverages such as red wine and coffee also damage the enamel by discoloring it. Although stains do not necessarily undermine the integrity of your teeth, they can be unsightly.

What Can I Do to Prevent Enamel Damage?

Fortunately, there are several measures you can take to prevent your enamel from discoloring or decaying. The easiest way to avoid decay is to steer clear of high-acidity foods. This may not always be possible, but eliminating sugary fruit juices and soda from your diet is a good start. Brushing your teeth after each meal and flossing frequently also preserves your enamel. Another good idea is to rinse your mouth with water or mouthwash after eating to wash away high-acidity particles.

Although enamel damage is common, it does not have to be an inevitable occurrence. Knowing the foods that harm your teeth gives you the tools to prevent discoloration and decay. With some easy preventive measures, your teeth will stay strong and white for years to come.

When is the Best Time to Floss?

Categories: Oral Health

At our dental office, we prefer our patients to practice good oral hygiene between office visits. Part of that process includes flossing, which is the process of cleaning between the teeth to remove food and debris from the areas that are hard to reach with a toothbrush. When food is allowed to remain between the teeth, it provides a breeding ground for bacteria, which can cause periodontal disease.

Should You Floss Before or After Brushing?

According to the American Dental Association, you can floss either before or after brushing, according to your own preference. By flossing first, you can brush away dislodged food debris afterward. On the other hand, brushing first allows you to loosen plaque between the teeth, making it easier to floss more effectively.

Whichever you choose, the most important goal is to floss thoroughly. That means using a fresh strand of dental floss each day, and carefully pulling it back and forth between all of the teeth. Do not skip flossing because your teeth look or feel clean.

When to Floss

Unlike brushing, you need only floss between your teeth once per day. Although you may choose to do it in the morning or afternoon, many prefer to floss at night to prevent food and debris from remaining in the crevices of the teeth overnight. This could prevent the build-up of plaque too, which is a cause of tooth decay.

Help with Flossing

If you have questions about your flossing technique or what type of floss is best for your teeth, contact our office. The staff will be more than happy to assist you in perfecting your home hygiene regimen. In most cases, you can choose between interdental cleaning picks or flexible floss strands to perform your daily flossing routine. If you have permanent oral appliances or restorations, be sure to follow the flossing instructions provided to you, and contact our office with any questions.

The Truth Behind Six Popular Dental Myths

Categories: Dentistry

Myths about dentistry and general dental care abound. These myths are passed on by word of mouth and are presented as being factual; although they are typically inaccurate. There are dangers associated with dental misconceptions. By believing in these dental myths, you are placing your oral health at risk and you may not be receiving proper dental care. Find the answers behind many popular dental myths.

Myth: It is not important for young children to care for their baby teeth.

Fact: Although baby teeth are not permanent, long-term problems with permanent teeth can develop if baby teeth are not properly cared for. The malpositioning of permanent teeth, misalignment issues, and early orthodontic treatment are just a few of the concerns related to losing baby teeth too early as a result of tooth decay. It is crucial that children learn the basics of proper oral hygiene at an early age. Doing so will help them form permanent habits that are essential for oral health.

Myth: If you are not having problems with your teeth, seeing a dentist is not necessary.

Fact: Most dental issues are not evident in the early stages. It is only when they have progressed further that you start to notice there is a problem. In most cases, only a dentist can detect when there is a problem. Scheduling an appointment in our office twice a year for regular cleanings and exams is a vital component to your dental health. In this way, dental problems can be treated early before they become a serious concern and require a more advanced form of treatment.

Myth: You should avoid brushing and flossing if your gums are bleeding.

Fact: If your gums are bleeding, it is usually a warning sign of gum disease or gingivitis. You should continue to brush and floss your teeth gently during this time since poor oral hygiene is a primary cause of bleeding gums. If the bleeding worsens or continues to be a problem, contact our office to schedule an appointment.

Myth: Chewing sugar-free gum is a good substitute for brushing your teeth.

Fact: Although chewing sugar-free gum offers the benefits of freshening your breath and minor teeth cleaning between meals, it should not be considered a substitute for brushing and flossing. Dental plaque and food particles can only be thoroughly removed by brushing and flossing.

Myth: Cavities are only a concern when you are a child.

Fact: Cavities can develop at any age. There are many situations and conditions that place both adults and elders at risk for the development of cavities. As an adult, you are more prone to developing receding gums, which can quickly result in tooth decay. Many adults and elders also take prescription medications that cause dry mouth. This can cause tooth decay as there is an insufficient amount of saliva within the mouth to wash away bacteria and neutralize acids.

Myth: Once you treat a decayed tooth, it will not become decayed again.

Fact: It is possible for other areas of the tooth to become decayed; although proper brushing and flossing will prevent the treated area of the tooth from becoming decayed again. If a filling gets old and begins to break down, there is a possibility that bacteria can become trapped inside and cause tooth decay.

How to Prevent Bad Breath

Categories: Oral Health

We all experience bad breath every now and then. Usually it’s a minor inconvenience resolved with a thorough brushing. There are times, however, when bad breath becomes a recurring condition that can be a major source of embarrassment. Fortunately, mouth odor is preventable. By familiarizing yourself with the causes of bad breath, you’ll be able to take action and keep it in check.

Brushing and Flossing Habits: Proper care of your teeth and gums will go a long way toward maintaining fresh breath. The American Dental Association recommends brushing twice each day with a fluoride toothpaste. Don’t forget to brush your tongue; bacteria can gather there as well. To remove odor-causing food particles from between your teeth, be sure to floss once per day.

Diet: The phrase “you are what you eat” is especially true when it comes to mouth odor. Researchers at New York University list strong-smelling foods such as pastrami, garlic, and onions as common culprits of bad breath. If you’re dieting, you may notice that your breath is worse between meals. Infrequent eating results in lower saliva production, which can cause bacteria buildup in the mouth. Eating meals at regular intervals can help reduce this accumulation.

Dry Mouth: The American Dental Association attributes a condition called xerostomia, better known as dry mouth, to bad breath. Dry mouth is exactly what it sounds like: a decreased amount of saliva resulting from continuous mouth breathing, salivary gland problems, or certain medications. The lack of beneficial saliva can lead to a buildup of odor-causing particles in the mouth. To combat dry mouth, be sure to stay hydrated or try sucking on a sugar-free candy.

Tobacco Use: Yet another entry on the long list of reasons to kick the habit, tobacco products can also contribute to bad breath. The experts at Ohio State University’s Wexner Medical Center attribute tobacco use to a wide range of problems with the teeth and gums. In addition to mouth odor, potential problems include periodontal disease, loss of taste, gum irritation, and oral cancer.

Medical Conditions: Bad breath can be a warning sign or symptom of another underlying health issue. According to the Wexner Medical Center, mouth odor can indicate a respiratory infection, diabetes, a gastrointestinal disorder, or issues with the liver and kidneys. Symptoms vary from person to person, so if you suspect that your bad breath might be stemming from a larger problem, make an appointment with your doctor to address your concerns.

Additional Prevention: Scheduling regular dental checkups will help keep plaque buildup and gum disease from developing. Contact our office about any oral health issues you may be experiencing. We can provide professional recommendations tailored to your situation that will help keep your mouth as fresh and clean as it can be.

A Healthy Mouth Starts With What You Eat

Categories: Oral Health

Most people know that visiting the dentist is an essential part of caring for their teeth. Regular checkups and cleanings are, of course, very important. But what some people don’t realize is that good dental hygiene starts long before you get to the dentist’s office. You may be saying, “I know, it starts with my toothbrush and floss.” But actually, oral health begins even before that. A healthy smile starts at your grocery store.

Dental checkups can detect problems early on and address them, but only good nutrition can give your teeth and gums the healthy foundation they need. If your diet is rich in tooth-friendly nutrients, you will be less prone to gum disease, tooth decay, and even jawbone loss.

So, which nutrients are the most important? Here are a few tooth-building superstars.

Calcium
We all know that calcium builds strong bones and teeth. Most expectant mothers are even aware that the calcium-rich foods they eat during pregnancy will ensure that their babies develop strong, healthy teeth later on. But did you know that calcium is important to your teeth long into adulthood?

On its “Milk Matters” page, the National Institutes of Health tells us that calcium can protect teeth against decay. Furthermore, a 2001 study published by the US National Library of Medicine found that elderly people who had adequate amounts of calcium in their diets were more likely to retain their teeth as they aged.

Good sources of calcium include yogurt, cheeses, milk, and leafy green vegetables. If you can’t get an enough calcium from your diet alone, talk to your doctor about adding a calcium supplement.

Vitamin D
Vitamin D is sometimes called the sunshine vitamin because your skin can synthesize it during exposure to sunlight. Vitamin D could also be called the healthy smile vitamin. It not only helps your teeth, but it also keeps your gums healthy. Another study published by the National Library of Medicine has shown a connection between low levels of dietary vitamin D and gingivitis. People in the study who had more of the vitamin in their diets had healthier gums.

While most of us get plenty of vitamin D from sun exposure, people who live farther from the equator may need to take a supplement during the winter months.

Vitamin C
Long ago, British sailors were called “Limeys” because their superiors made them eat limes on long ocean voyages. Why? Because limes are rich in vitamin C and without it, the sailors got scurvy and often lost their teeth. While there’s little danger of developing scurvy today, a study in the year 2000 of people who ranged in age from 20 to 90, showed that vitamin C is still necessary for healthy gums. People in the study who had the lowest dietary intake of this essential vitamin were at the highest risk of gum disease.

Vitamin C is perhaps the easiest of vitamins to get from your diet. Rich sources include strawberries, apricots, oranges, lemons and, of course, limes. Red and yellow peppers also have lots of vitamin C, as do tomatoes and brussel sprouts.

Never put off regular dental checkups and cleanings, but in between appointments, watch your diet. Making sure these essential nutrients are a part of your daily intake will ensure that your teeth and gums are as healthy as they can be.

Sensitive Teeth? Try Changing Your Toothpaste

Categories: Oral Health

If you have noticed that your teeth are starting to feel more sensitive than usual, you might initially avoid foods and drinks that seem to cause discomfort. For example, you feel some dental pain when you drink a hot cup of coffee in the morning or while chewing on a cold apple. While it’s a normal reaction to avoid foods or drinks that lead to pain or discomfort, it’s better to determine the cause of the problem and take steps to improve the health and quality of your teeth.

Causes of Tooth Sensitivity
– If only a single tooth is sensitive, it could be caused by a cavity. In other cases, the tooth might be cracked. These situations require care from a trained dental professional. You may need to get a filling, a new crown, or a root canal to reduce the tooth sensitivity.

– If many or all of your teeth are sensitive, you may have recently begun consuming increasingly larger amounts of foods or drinks that are high in acid. The acid dissolves the protective enamel of your teeth, exposing the dentin. The tooth’s dentin is sensitive to heat and cold, as well as sticky or acidic foods that can trigger pain.

– Teeth whitening treatments can also cause tooth sensitivity.

– Increased stress in your life also can indirectly lead to tooth sensitivity. High stress can cause you to grind your teeth while you sleep. If you suffer from teeth grinding, also known as bruxism, one treatment option may be a special night guard appliance to wear while you sleep.

– Weather changes are another factor to consider. If it starts getting cold suddenly, the cool air you breathe in may trigger tooth pain, especially when enamel has been eroded from your teeth.

Reducing Tooth Sensitivity
– Avoid consuming foods and drinks that are high in acid. For example, citrus fruits and their juices can wear down your teeth’s enamel over time. Taper down your consumption to minimize teeth erosion. Try using a straw when drinking acidic juices in order to minimize their contact with your teeth. Rinse your mouth with water after consuming acidic foods and drinks.

– Start brushing your teeth with the softest available toothbrush. Use gentle motions to brush your teeth in order to minimize abrading their surfaces.

– You may be interested in switching to a new toothpaste to help you with the discomfort. Select a toothpaste formulated for sensitive teeth. You can find a variety of brands at your local pharmacy or supermarket. Follow the manufacturer’s instructions, particularly paying attention to how long you can use the product. If your teeth are still sensitive after using the special toothpaste, you should contact our office so we can rule out a more serious underlying problem.

Fun Ways to Encourage Children to Brush Their Teeth

Categories: Oral Health

It’s that dreaded time of day for many parents — the nighttime routine. As kids whine and stomp up the stairs as you send them off for pajamas and bedtime, you face the daunting task once again of trying to get your children to brush their teeth. While this is certainly a chore for many parents across the country, the following are several tips you can use in order to make brushing teeth a fun, enjoyable time.

1. Give them exciting toothbrushes. By buying your children special toothbrushes in their favorite colors, or decorated with their favorite TV characters, they will see their toothbrush as more of a toy than a tool. By keeping things fresh and fun, children will be excited to use their toothbrush since it represents a little bit of who they are and what they enjoy.

2. Make a rewards chart. For each night your children willingly — and without argument — brush their teeth, give them a sticker. After a week of stickers, give them a special reward.

3. Keep it fresh with different toothpaste. While adults may not care too much what flavor their toothpaste is, children are a different story. Be sure to purchase flavored toothpaste that kids will enjoy. Mint is always a good option, but many toothpaste companies create other flavors as well, including fruit flavored toothpastes and even bubble gum toothpaste.

4. Buy a fun flossing tool. Flossing is an essential part of good oral hygiene, especially for children. Encourage this habit along with tooth brushing by purchasing a fun flossing tool. These colorful contraptions get children excited about flossing their teeth, and if you find that they prefer flossing to brushing tell them that the only way they can floss, is if they brush their teeth first.

Instead of making children feel like brushing their teeth is something to be dreaded, parents can make this ritual a lot more fun and exciting using these tips. According to Parenting Squad, the more fun parents make this routine, the more children will be encouraged to brush their teeth. We all know that a healthy mouth and healthy child begin with healthy teeth — so getting kids in the good habit of brushing often is essential in the long run.